How to Build the Perfect LinkedIn Profile [INFOGRAPHIC]

Got a LinkedIn profile? Congrats. Now you’re only competing for attention with another 225+ million users. By putting some time into building your profile, you can stand out from the crowd and we’ve put some of our tips into the infographic below. You may or may not reach perfection but hopefully you’ll get some ideas.

Takeaways:

  • Start with a good picture. People like visuals on your profile and your professional photo is the most important one.
  • People outside your network can’t see your contact details so make sure to put them in your summary.
  • Keep things fresh by doing regular status updates, share interesting and useful content.
  • Join groups and follow companies to get relevant content. Do you follow us by the way?

RELATED: LinkedIn Usage by Country [SLIDES]

  • TheSportsResume

    Great graphic timeline.

    • Arthur Habrial

      Thanks a lot, I’ll try to make new ones later. Have a nice day.
      Arthur.

  • http://www.StevenARodriguez.com Steven Rodriguez

    Nice graphic, but completely inaccessible for people who are blind or low vision and use screen reader software.

    • Arthur Habrial

      Hi Steven and thanks for your comment. However I don’t really understand it. Do you mean it’s difficult to read what is written on the infographic? I’m really sorry about that, I’ve tried to make it as clear as possible.
      Arthur.

      • http://www.StevenARodriguez.com Steven Rodriguez

        Hi Arthur thank you for the follow-up. I am referring to screen reader software being unable to translate the image file for people who are blind. If alt text isn’t provided for images, the image information is inaccessible, for example, to people who cannot see and use a screen reader that reads aloud the information on a page, including the alt text for the visual image. See http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php for accessibility standards.

        “One of the biggest accessibility problems on the Web today is the lack of alternative text for graphics and images. Individuals who are blind often use screen readers or refreshable Braille devices that read the text on the page to them. When these assistive technologies come across images without alt text, they are unable to communicate their meaning.”

        Source: http://webaim.org/techniques/images/alt_text

        However, when the main content of a page is all on a graphic, then communicating to audience that rely on screen reader software through “alt text” becomes much harder.

  • http://www.seoidiots.info/ Sujit Kumar Lucky

    nice descriptive view of LinkedIn uses ! really have serious intellectual users rather than other social media places ! great work !

    • Arthur Habrial

      Thanks Sujit,
      it’s true, as a professional social network LinkedIn is a great place to share with other fellows.
      Glad you liked the graphic.
      Arthur.

  • Gixerstu

    I found the info very useful but I’d be interested in your views of posting EVERY day.

    I find these updates from my contacts intrusive and verging on spam. I don’t mind an occasional useful update but when one of my contacts posts his latest blog entry on every group we share it gets me very close to getting rid of him!

    • Arthur Habrial

      Hi Gixerstu,
      According to me LinkedIn is above all a social network. It means you’re on LinkedIn to get new contacts, share and receive content (via your feed or groups). I think it’s quite important to share everyday and especially as much as possible in the groups you’re in. If you wrote a blog post, it’s to be read by as many people as possible and the best way to find relevant receivers is to post in groups.
      But I understand what you mean, too many updates every day can be considered as spam. You just need to find the right amount.
      I hope I helped with this reply and thank you for your comment!
      Arthur.

  • http://www.ryanmickley.com Ryan Mickley

    Arthur – I’m curious to hear your perspective on exchanging LinkedIn recommendations. i.e. people that give a recommendation in exchange for one. I see this happen a lot. I often come across profiles that are showing recommendations from people that they recommended as well. In your opinion, which is better no recommendations or 5 recommendations that are clearly “tit for tat”? ….Great infographic!

    • Arthur Habrial

      Hi Ryan. Your question is interesting. When you receive a recommendation on LinkedIn, it’s asking you first if you want to approve it and secondly if you want to write one for the person who endorsed you. I assume most of the people think it’s nice to write one for someone who proved he/she appreciated to work with you.
      Only give recommendation to people you enjoyed to work with and don’t give one just because you received one. But this is my own opinion and the way I proceed.
      Hope this helped and thanks for your comment.
      Arthur.

      • http://www.ryanmickley.com Ryan Mickley

        Makes sense. I often wondered how much stock recruiters and potential employers put into a LinkedIn recommendation. I certainly dont think they could hurt the candidate, but I dont know how much it helps them either (outside of LinkedIn). Thank you for the feedback!

    • Darren Ledger

      Hi Ryan, good question and one that I focus on quite closely when helping people develop their LinkedIn profiles. Generally as a rule in my opinion recommendations should be provided by unbiased and objective contacts, ideally by clients who have used your services or actual managers who you have worked for.

      I come across many recommendations which have been provided by friends, peers and even family and if anything this merely undermines the whole point of recommendations.

      • http://www.ryanmickley.com Ryan Mickley

        Darren – spot on. I agree. Recommendations should be organic and genuine. When it becomes obvious that the recommendations or endorsements are exchanged between friends/ family it dilutes the purity of the act. I usually instruct my clients to give value in a different way and then ask for a recommendation. “Pay it forward” prevails while keeping the recommendation credible.

  • ConnectHarshal

    Nice Infograph!

    However, I would to add one more point to what you have represented in a beautiful way:

    Shouldn’t we also include personal role and responsibility in detail section of each job? (e.g. what exactly we do, some key stats regarding how YOU helped others) Rather than just copy-paste company’s about us & service/offering details? Since, people are more interested in connecting with individuals, learning what exactly they do is first preference. (and then company services come into the picture)

    This is just my view and observation. If you can kindly share your opinion.

    Thanks!
    Harshal
    http://linkedin.com/in/harshalkharod
    http://harshalkharod.blog.com/2012/09/29/linkedin-for-start-up-business-development-explained/
    @ConnectHarshal:disqus

    • Arthur Habrial

      Hi Harshal!

      You’re right, personal information are important too and it can be very useful to write what you’re doing beside your job. However LinkedIn is a professional social network so don’t be afraid to write a lot about your job and the company you’re working for.
      Thanks for your comment!
      Arthur.

  • http://helpology.org/ Helpology™

    Based on our research, so far, this infographic is the most helpful and simplest way that works to master LinkedIn. Thank you!

    • Arthur Habrial

      Thanks a lot! Glad you found it interesting and helpful!

  • Darren Ledger

    Excellent piece of work, straight forward and clearly explained. My only slight reservation for many people is the one about placing contact details in the summary. I would advise that it is worth considering a number of points on this particular action. The first being that you may very well get spammed or at the very least be contacted with an abundance of sales calls. This applies in equal measure to actually having all of your contact information in your contact section.

    But otherwise a great post.